About Mario

Mario Soto is a Sport Psychology Consultant with an extensive background in performance sports such as basketball, baseball, martial arts (3rd degree in Shaolin Kempo Karate) as well as being a professional working actor for ten years earning his union status in all three guilds (SAG, AEA, and AFTRA).  He has coached, played, or worked at the youth, high school and collegiate level (locally & internationally) and holds a master’s degree in Sport & Performance Psychology Consulting from California State University Fullerton under the tutelage of the some of the most well respected Sport Psychology consultants in the world – Dr. Ken Ravizza, Dr. Traci Statler, Dr. Andrea Becker, and Dr. Len Wiersma.

Mario Soto has worked with a multitude of teams, athletes, coaches, and artists (musicians and actors) at the amateur, olympic and professional levels assisting them in dealing with stage fright, stress reduction, self-doubt and low esteem, improving performance routines (pre/present/post), goal setting, mental toughness, focus, imagery and visualization, motivation, confidence, dealing with pressure, over/under arousal, team dynamics, cohesion and helping foster culture change.

The diversity of people Mario has worked with have included actors and musicians, top boxers from Freddy Roach’s world famous Wild Card gym, Mixed Martial Arts fighters, Olympic and collegiate athletes as well as local high school and club teams in the disciplines of soccer, baseball, basketball, golf, equestrian riding (jumper, hunter, dressage, & barrel racing) softball, track and field, cross country, swimming, tennis, sailing, wrestling, rugby and lacrosse.

He has lectured and consulted around the country on topics like “Being a great sports parent”,  “How to coach and relate to today’s athlete”, and “Turning yourself into an elite performer” and held seminars on improving one’s performance in the workplace for sports officials and businesses.   His practice is headquartered in Southern California, but he travels extensively working to educate, empower, and inspire those who wish to seek an edge by unlocking their potential.

“Anyone can benefit from getting out of their own way.  We’re just a bit overwhelmed by life’s distractions, the misperceptions of pressure and sometimes the inability of letting go of our past mistakes.  It’s my hope to provide people with the tools and confidence to believe in themselves, create realistic expectations, and develop the discipline to stay on their journey towards excellence.” – Coach Mario

59 minutes ago

Mariosportsdoc.com
Coach Mike Kirby is one of the most real people you’ll ever meet. His stories are priceless and his passion for the game is only second to how much he cares for how the game should be played and respected. When he calls saying we are playing uphill and struggling a bit- you get in car abd show up 10 hours later. #family ... See MoreSee Less
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3 days ago

Mariosportsdoc.com
If you are an influencer of lives (mentor, teacher, coach, manager, leader, parent) then this chart should be plastered on your wall as a mission statement. Our words impact those we care about. Powerful and humbling reminder to build up, not tear down. ... See MoreSee Less
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4 days ago

Mariosportsdoc.com
In order to understand the answers you must willing to investigate the question. #canyouhandlethetruth? ... See MoreSee Less
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5 days ago

Mariosportsdoc.com
There is a great article in the Athletic Ink about Joey Votto of the Cincinnati Reds entitled: Joey Votto is playing chess, and the rest of us are playing checkers. While he played mental games, there was a method to his madness which was to make sure he was in charge of his thoughts so they serve his goals. Here's a former teammate sharing one example of his commitment to his process:Gennett: There was one time where he got buzzed by a lefty. It almost hit him in the face at like 97. He was just shaking his head, trying to forget it. … (Joey) just gets out of the box, doesn’t even call time, and the umpire just stands up. And he literally goes to the dugout. He ran out of the box and took a walking lap over to the dugout. And then he keeps walking, and then just jumps with both feet into the box, puts his hands up ready to hit, doesn’t say a word. The pitcher is like: “What the heck just happened?” The umpire is like: “What’s going on?” We’re all looking around like: “What’s going on?” Then he draws a walk. So I was like: “Joey, what the heck were you doing? What was that?” He’s like: “Scoot, I had that thought that I was vulnerable of getting hit in the face.” I was like: “Well, that’s pretty normal. The guy just threw a ball 97 right by your face.” He goes: “Yeah, but I can’t have that thought when I get in the box.”Learn how to OWN your version of “THE BOX”! ... See MoreSee Less
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